Skip to Content
You searched for
Search
Creator Beckman, Arnold O. Remove constraint Creator: Beckman, Arnold O. Subject Beckman Instruments, inc. Remove constraint Subject: Beckman Instruments, inc.

Search Constraints

Search Results

    • 1985-Apr-23

    This interview, the first of several with Arnold Beckman conducted by the Chemical Heritage Foundation, begins with a discussion of Beckman's teenage experience as an industrial chemist at a local gas works in…

    • 1985-Jul-23

    The second interview begins with Arnold Beckman describing the National Technical Laboratories in the late 1930s. He details NTL policies and operations. The majority of the transcript focuses on the change from NTL to…

    • Liston-Becker Company, Inc.
    • 1953-Jun-08

    This memo details research about the the Liston-Becker Company, which Beckman Instruments acquired in 1955.

    • 1953-Feb-25

    Arnold O. Beckman notes that some of the company's instruments (including pH meters and infrared spectrophotometers) are already being used to monitor air quality, and expresses interest in developing instruments…

    • 1954-Nov-26

    Glenn Joseph expresses appreciation for a tour of Beckman's Fullerton plant and the gift of a pH meter themed desk set.

    In the 1930s, Joseph approached Beckman for assistance measuring pH for the citrus industry. The…

    • General Manager for Germany
    • 1954-Sep-15

    In this letter, John F. Bishop relates a conversation with Herbert Hoover, Jr., in which Hoover recommended that Beckman choose "a man who understands the American way of business," rather than a European candidate, to…

    • Telephone Interview with Dr. Shockley
    • 1956-Jan-31

    In 1955, Arnold O. Beckman and William Shockley entered business together when they established Shockley Semiconductor Laboratories as a subsidiary of Beckman Instruments, Inc. with the goal of mass producing…

    • Dr. William Shockley publicity results
    • 1955-Sep-30

    In 1955, Arnold O. Beckman and William Shockley entered business together when they established Shockley Semiconductor Laboratories as a subsidiary of Beckman Instruments, Inc. with the goal of mass producing…

    • 1956 Annual Report - Employee Relations
    • 1956-Jul-20

    The memo discusses a "favorable year in employee relations," including employees' reactions to new policies, the integration of newly acquired businesses, a supervisory training program, retirement benefits, health…

    • 1950-Dec-26 – 1951-Aug-07

    These internal memos document a year's worth of human resources and other personnel decisions made at National Technical Laboratories, the precursor to Beckman Instruments. Some entries may have been written by Arnold…

    • 1957-Sep-20

    Architect William Pereira writes to invite Arnold O. Beckman to a dinner in celebration of an award for the Helipot building in Newport Beach, California. The Pereira & Luckman-designed building was to be honored as one…

    • 1947-Aug-15

    This letter includes a report on existing Beckman trademarks as of 1947, including information on the "acidimeter" and the point at which that instrument became known as the pH meter (1935).

    • 1956-Dec-03

    The memorandum documents complaints about the architecture firm Pereira & Luckman. Duncan states that "we have been anywhere from moderately displeased to completely upset with P & L."

    • 1946-Apr-26

    In this letter, Beckman requests that a former employee, Robert A. Crane, receive an early discharge from the Navy in light of his father's poor health. Beckman notes that he has an open position for Crane.

    • 1945-May-10

    In this letter, Beckman requested permission to discuss the Pauling Oxygen Meter and made the case that the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) should lift the "Restricted" classification.

    • 1944

    The letter expresses Bush's "personal and official appreciation and commendation" for contracted work performed in furtherance of the war effort.

    • 1949-May

    This paper describes the use of an older style of glass prism in a new spectrophotometer made by Beckman Instruments. This new spectrophotometer would become the Model B, the glass prism making it a cheaper alternative…

    • 1936-Aug

    This report outlines the colorimetric and electrical ways to determine the pH of a solution and the various kinds of electrodes that can be used with electrical instruments. Beckman concludes that a method using glass…

    • 1945-Aug-11

    In this letter, Prentiss shares his initial impressions of a prototype aircraft oxygen meter.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers ended up…

    • 1945-Nov-14

    In this handwritten letter, Prentiss discusses reports on the oxygen meter contracts and the possibility of working for Phillips Petroleum, despite his lack of enthusiasm for relocating to Oklahoma.

    Developed from a…

    • 1945-Jan-23

    In this letter, Beckman discusses the testing and production of various models of the Pauling oxygen meter. Model F is discussed in the most detail, but Models P, G, and a damaged aircraft Model L are also mentioned.

    • 1945-Feb-28

    The letter discusses the various parties interested in testing Pauling oxygen meters and the possibility of meeting in Washington or Philadelphia.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology…

    • 1945-Jul-02

    Arnold Beckman expresses concern that the secrecy of the oxygen meter project could adversely affect sales in the anticipated post-war markets.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind…

    • 1945-Jul-02

    In this letter, Beckman describes the specifications of the aircraft model oxygen meter (the Model L).

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers…

    • 1945-Jul-11

    The letter discusses testing of the Pauling hospital oxygen meter and concerns about its ruggedness--specifically, its ability to survive being dropped onto a stone floor from a height of three feet.

    Developed from a…