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Creator Beckman, Arnold O. Remove constraint Creator: Beckman, Arnold O. Date 1945 to 1949 Remove constraint Date: <span class='from'>1945</span> to <span class='to'>1949</span>

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    • 1949-May

    This paper describes the use of an older style of glass prism in a new spectrophotometer made by Beckman Instruments. This new spectrophotometer would become the Model B, the glass prism making it a cheaper alternative…

    • 1948-Oct-07

    A chemist with Standard Oil Company's Research Department, Steininger explored the possible creation of an instrument to analyze and record hydrogen sulfide concentrations in oil refineries, a safety measure otherwise…

    • 1947-Aug-15

    This letter includes a report on existing Beckman trademarks as of 1947, including information on the "acidimeter" and the point at which that instrument became known as the pH meter (1935).

    • 1946-Oct

    In a series of one page messages to the employees of National Technical Laboratories, Arnold Beckman laid out a case against unionization.

    • 1946-Apr-26

    In this letter, Beckman requests that a former employee, Robert A. Crane, receive an early discharge from the Navy in light of his father's poor health. Beckman notes that he has an open position for Crane.

    • 1945-Feb-08

    Letter regarding the extension of the military contract for Beckman Instruments' Pauling Oxygen Meter development. This letter also mentions the possibility of using the instrument inside oxygen tents.

    Developed from a…

    • 1945-Feb-06

    In this letter, Dr. Prentiss inquires about the possibility of combining a moisture detector and an oxygen meter, presumably for use in submarines. At the time, Dr. Spencer S. Prentiss was working for the National…

    • 1945-Feb-06

    Letter inquiring about the price and delivery of model P and A Pauling Oxygen Meters for use by the National Defense Research Committee. This letter was originally sent to Dr. Beckman with another letter from Spencer…

    • 1945-May-29

    Letter regarding the possible development of an aviation model of the Pauling Oxygen Meter for the Bureau of Aeronautics.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’…

    • 1945-Feb-20

    Request from the National Defense Research Committee for a Model L Pauling Oxygen Meter to test at high altitudes in airplanes.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman…

    • 1945-Feb-16

    The letter regards the procurement of Pauling meters for use on submarines and issues of cost and portability.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen…

    • 1945-Feb-03

    In this letter, J. H. Rushton of the National Defense Research Committee requests an update on the status of F and G model oxygen meter instruments.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology…

    • 1945-Feb-14

    Arnold Beckman informs J. H. Rushton that the Model G oxygen meter is ready for testing, but the Model F is not. An order has been received from the Linde Company, but not fulfilled, and an experimental instrument was…

    • 1945-Feb-16

    This letter regards the use of oxygen meters on submarines and in hospitals, issues of cost and portability, and the Naval Research Laboratory's interest in detecting other gases.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design…

    • 1945-Nov-12

    Arnold Beckman discusses the status of contract reports, an instrument damaged during shipment, and asks about Spencer Prentiss's post-war plans. He expects to consult with Linus Pauling to decide which instrument to…

    • 1945-Sep-20

    Arnold Beckman notes that he has been busy after the "termination of the war" and discusses bugs in the Model E and complaints about the ruggedness of the oxygen meter.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during…

    • 1945-Jul-11

    The letter discusses testing of the Pauling hospital oxygen meter and concerns about its ruggedness--specifically, its ability to survive being dropped onto a stone floor from a height of three feet.

    Developed from a…

    • 1945-Jul-02

    In this letter, Beckman describes the specifications of the aircraft model oxygen meter (the Model L).

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers…

    • 1945-Jul-02

    Arnold Beckman expresses concern that the secrecy of the oxygen meter project could adversely affect sales in the anticipated post-war markets.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind…

    • 1945-Feb-28

    The letter discusses the various parties interested in testing Pauling oxygen meters and the possibility of meeting in Washington or Philadelphia.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology…

    • 1945-Jan-23

    In this letter, Beckman discusses the testing and production of various models of the Pauling oxygen meter. Model F is discussed in the most detail, but Models P, G, and a damaged aircraft Model L are also mentioned.

    • 1945-Nov-14

    In this handwritten letter, Prentiss discusses reports on the oxygen meter contracts and the possibility of working for Phillips Petroleum, despite his lack of enthusiasm for relocating to Oklahoma.

    Developed from a…

    • 1945-Aug-11

    In this letter, Prentiss shares his initial impressions of a prototype aircraft oxygen meter.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers ended up…

    • 1945-May-10

    In this letter, Beckman requested permission to discuss the Pauling Oxygen Meter and made the case that the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) should lift the "Restricted" classification.

    • 1945-May-24

    In this letter, Churchill confirms that the National Defense Research Committee (NDRC) has granted Beckman permission to discuss the Pauling Oxygen Meter at an American Chemical Society meeting.