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Creator Dietrich, T. A. Remove constraint Creator: Dietrich, T. A.

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    • 1966
    • Undated
    • 1954
    • circa 1975

    In 1954, Beckman Instruments' headquarters moved from Pasadena to Fullerton, California.

    The images with dates inscribed on the back indicate that they were taken between 1954 and 1975, although some images are…

    • 1960s

    The NDIR uses a nondispersive infrared sensor to detect the presence of gasses.

    • 1954 – 1969

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers ended up doing such diverse jobs as monitoring astronauts’ respiration, maintaining packaged food safety,…

    • 1956 – 1969

    Beckman Instruments entered the gas chromatograph business in 1956 with the acquisition of the successful Watts Manufacturing Company. Later that year, Beckman Instruments produced its first gas chromatograph, the GC-1,…

    • 1960 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    The unit, an Accu-Bend Sequential Programmer, appears to have been manufactured by Coast-Costello.

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    Potentiometers regulate the flow of electricity, like the volume dial on a radio. In 1940, Arnold O. Beckman was unsatisfied with dials on the market, so he designed his own helical potentiometers, or helipots, for use…

    • 1950 – 1969

    This photograph shows Helipot trimmers on a circuit board.