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Format Image Remove constraint Format: Image Rights No Copyright - United States Remove constraint Rights: No Copyright - United States Date 1950 Remove constraint Date: <span class='single'>1950</span>

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    • 1950s

    Portrait of agricultural economist Gae Adamson Bennett (b. 1917). While working for the United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, Bennett co-authored numerous volumes on agricultural production…

    • 1950s

    A booklet that describes and explains atomic energy in non-specialist terms with similes to common materials like a drop of water or a fireplace. Con Edison is the energy provider for the New York City metro area, they…

    • circa 1950

    Issued in the denomination of ten, this green-printed note is styled after a banknote including the General Electric Company logo as well as a vignette of the Chemical Department located in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

    • 1948 – 1954

    Advertising brochure for Ac'cent, a pure mono sodium glutamate (MSG) food additive product manufactured by the Amino Products Division of the International Minerals & Chemical Corporation.

    • circa 1950

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Bulletin 202-C
    • 1950s

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers ended up doing such diverse jobs as monitoring astronauts’ respiration, maintaining packaged food safety,…

    • 1950-Sep-12

    Close-up view of a newly-installed reproduction of the Dow Chemical Company's diamond emblem on the roof of the South Power Station at the Company's headquarters in Midland, Michigan. An unidentified Power Division…

    • Bulletin 170
    • circa 1950

    Promotional, color pamphlet for the Model H pH Meter.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the…

    • 1950s

    This advertisement highlights uses for Models R, H, and M pH meters in the water and wastewater treatment industry.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California…

    • 1950s

    The advertisement touts the features of Beckman glass electrodes and the company's position in the instrumentation field.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the…

    • Bulletin 168-B
    • 1950-Oct

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1950-Apr

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Product Data Sheet O2—8120
    • 1950s

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers ended up doing such diverse jobs as monitoring astronauts’ respiration, maintaining packaged food safety,…

    • 1946 – 1955

    The Beckman Instruments IR spectrophotometers began as a request from the Office of Rubber Reserve to Arnold O. Beckman in 1942, asking for an infrared spectrophotometer that they could use to create rubber. Under this…

    • 1950s

    General view of U.S. Department of Agriculture personnel at an unidentified facility. Per a notation on the verso of the photograph, the individuals are identified (in no particular order) as follows: K.S. Love;…

    • 1950s

    General view of an unidentified apparatus, possibly a hopper or type of granulation equipment, at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility, likely the U.S.D.A.'s Agricultural Engineering Laboratory. Three…

    • 1950s – circa

    Two views of a chemist inserting radioactive materials into an apparatus at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility. The U.S.D.A. commonly used radioactive material for a variety of research and testing,…

    • 1950s – circa

    General view of fertilizer trays on a suspension apparatus at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility.

    • 1950s – circa

    General view of a drillability apparatus with fertilizer hoppers, a starwheel, and rotating plate mechanism at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility.

    • 1950s – circa

    General view of a chemist handling radioactive material at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility. The U.S.D.A. commonly used radioactive material for a variety of research and testing, including the…

    • 1950s – circa

    View of chemist George Wieczorek (left) and an unidentified chemist using a Geiger counter to measure ionizing radiation in radioisotopes at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility. A box of…

    • 1950s – circa

    View of chemist George Wieczorek (right) and an unidentified chemist using a Geiger counter to measure ionizing radiation in an unknown substance at a U.S. Department of Agriculture facility. The U.S.D.A. commonly used…

    • 1950s – circa

    General view of a chemist handling radioactive material at an unidentified U.S. Department of Agriculture facility. The U.S.D.A. commonly used radioactive material for a variety of research and testing, including the…

    • 1950s – circa

    General view of a variety of tools used to handle radioactive substances and other materials at U.S. Department of Agriculture facilities. The tools are labelled with numbers, presumably corresponding to an…