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    • Dwg. No. 662-000740
    • 1949-Feb-08

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Bulletin No. 17
    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    The quinhydrone electrode in this instrument was an alternative to Beckman's glass electrode. Quinhydrone electrodes are not reliable at measuring a pH greater than 8, at measuring solutions with strong oxidizing or…

    • Bulletin 16
    • 1939

    The brochure details the components and specifications of the Model R pH meter, manufactured by National Technical Laboratories and branded as a "Beckman pH Meter."

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at…

    • circa 1950

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Beckman Instructions 81804
    • 1969-Jun

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 514-B
    • 1957-Jul

    Intentionally blank pages (28, 40, and 42) have been omitted from the digital work.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an…

    • Undated

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting “acidimeter” with its…

    • Bulletin 92-F
    • 1959-Oct

    The brochure outlines the importance of pH, Beckman's expertise, and several instruments: the Pocket pH meter, the Model G, the Model N, and the Zeromatic pH meter.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at…

    • Undated

    This mailer, sent to Beckman shareholders, was a reprint from a company publication and explained the significance of the pH meter.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from…

    • 1978-Dec-07

    The kit included buffers, storage solution, rinse, and a storage rack. Beckman oxygen electrodes were first used in their pH meters and later with other instruments.

    • Dwg. No. 293-000239
    • 1935-Oct-11

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Beckman Reprint R-6166
    • 1960-Oct

    The reprinted article, originally published in Bakers Digest, was written by employees of the Fleischmann Laboratories and featured photographs of Beckman pH meters.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934…

    • Bulletin 168-B
    • 1950-Oct

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1979-Jun-15

    The support stand made it easier to move electrodes between samples without tipping or using the electrodes' vertical alignment.

    • 1950-Apr

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Dwg. No. CD-2000B
    • 1945-Jan-24

    The diagram is annotated in red and blue ink, indicating first and second position.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an…

    • Precision pH control by precision buffer control
    • 1952-Feb-25

    The memo describes problems Eastman Kodak encountered with buffer solutions and the suggestion that the Model H-2 pH meter might be adapted for Kodak's applications. Lotze appears to be the creator of images as well as…

    • Model G Product Meeting Recommended Design Changes for Cost Reduction
    • 1956-Oct-10

    The memo discusses cost reductions to the Model G pH meter and is extensively annotated.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an…

    • 1952-Jul-18

    The illustration depicts glass electrodes that could be used with the Beckman Model G pH meter.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who…

    • Difficulties with Blue Tip Electrodes at Eastman Kodak
    • 1952-Jul-22

    The memo discusses issues affecting the electrodes used with a Model G pH meter, possible actions, and the risk of losing Kodak's business to a competitor such as Leeds & Northrup.