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Subject Hydrogen-ion concentration--Measurement--Instruments Remove constraint Subject: Hydrogen-ion concentration--Measurement--Instruments

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    • Appraisal of competitors electrodes
    • 1954-Apr-15

    The report concerns Beckman's electrode business, with a focus on Leeds & Northrup electrodes which "do not compare too favorably with ours."

    • 1955

    The questionnaire results identified pH meter features that would broadly appeal to biologists.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who…

    • 1947-Aug-15

    This letter includes a report on existing Beckman trademarks as of 1947, including information on the "acidimeter" and the point at which that instrument became known as the pH meter (1935).

    • What is new about L & N electrodes
    • 1955-Aug-15

    The report concerns the business of electrodes, including legally challenging questions about possible patent infringement.

    • Undated

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Beckman Instruction 015-082296
    • 1973-Jan

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Dwg. No. 662-000740
    • 1949-Feb-08

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Bulletin No. 17
    • 1935 – 1940

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 1935 – 1940

    The quinhydrone electrode in this instrument was an alternative to Beckman's glass electrode. Quinhydrone electrodes are not reliable at measuring a pH greater than 8, at measuring solutions with strong oxidizing or…

    • Bulletin 16
    • 1939

    The brochure details the components and specifications of the Model R pH meter, manufactured by National Technical Laboratories and branded as a "Beckman pH Meter."

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at…

    • circa 1950

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • Beckman Instructions 81804
    • 1969-Jun

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting instrument kicked off…

    • 514-B
    • 1957-Jul

    Intentionally blank pages (28, 40, and 42) have been omitted from the digital work.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an…

    • 1949

    Owners of the Model G would have found these instructions tucked inside the lid of the wooden case surrounding the instrument.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the…

    • 1977

    The certificate offers congratulations on the acquisition of a Beckman pH meter and gently suggests the purchase of Beckman electrodes to use with the instrument.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at…

    • 1938

    This page of instructions would have been located inside the lid of the pH meter, so that users would be able to read the instructions upon opening its case.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the…

    • 1937-Dec

    This page of instructions would have been located inside the lid of the pH meter, so that users would be able to read the instructions upon opening its case.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the…

    • 1936-Aug

    This report outlines the colorimetric and electrical ways to determine the pH of a solution and the various kinds of electrodes that can be used with electrical instruments. Beckman concludes that a method using glass…

    • 1939-Oct

    Written by NTL (the precursor to Beckman Instruments, Inc.), this document outlines new standards for buffer solutions used in pH meters.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist…

    • Bulletin 170
    • circa 1950

    Promotional, color pamphlet for the Model H pH Meter.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the…

  1. Self contained pH meter with wooden exterior; hinged lid opens to reveal meter face and inlaid paper instructions for use; the dial is calibrated from pH 0 to pH 13 in .1 pH divisions; porcelain enamel lined electrode…

    • Undated

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an accurate way to measure the acidity of his product. The resulting “acidimeter” with its…