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Date 1945 to 1949 Remove constraint Date: <span class='from'>1945</span> to <span class='to'>1949</span>

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    • 1945-Jan-22

    Letter regarding various requirements for the Pauling Oxygen Meter, including the possibility of making a combination moisture detector and oxygen meter. At the time, both Reuben Wood and Dr. Spencer S. Prentiss were…

    • 1945-Feb-06

    In this letter, Dr. Prentiss inquires about the possibility of combining a moisture detector and an oxygen meter, presumably for use in submarines. At the time, Dr. Spencer S. Prentiss was working for the National…

    • 1945-Feb-06

    Letter inquiring about the price and delivery of model P and A Pauling Oxygen Meters for use by the National Defense Research Committee. This letter was originally sent to Dr. Beckman with another letter from Spencer…

    • 1945-Aug-30

    Letter summarizes the final report produced by testing the Pauling Oxygen Meter at the Army Medical Center. The final recommendation of the report is that this oxygen meter should not be standardized for use by the U.S.…

    • 1945-May-29

    Letter regarding the possible development of an aviation model of the Pauling Oxygen Meter for the Bureau of Aeronautics.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’…

    • 1945-Sep-26

    This letter to Dr. Spencer S. Prentiss of the National Defense Research Committee describes the results of the clinical trial of the Pauling Oxygen Meter by the United States Army. The Army decided not to standardize…

    • 1945-Feb-20

    Request from the National Defense Research Committee for a Model L Pauling Oxygen Meter to test at high altitudes in airplanes.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman…

    • 1945-Jun-05

    Linus Pauling's oxygen meter was developed as a military project and the details were classified. In this letter, Pauling requested permission to discuss the oxygen meter at a Caltech seminar. He also states a desire to…

    • circa 1945

    Portrait of William M. Rand (1886-1981), President of the Monsanto Chemical Company from 1945 to 1951.

    William M. Rand was born on April 7th, 1886 in Watertown, Massachusetts and attended Chauncy Hall and Philip Exeter…

    • 1945-Feb-16

    The letter regards the procurement of Pauling meters for use on submarines and issues of cost and portability.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen…

    • 1945

    Dr. Arnold O. Beckman (1900-2004) invented the first commercially successful electric pH meter in 1934 and thus began a long career manufacturing scientific and medical instruments with National Technical Laboratories,…

    • Dwg. No. CD-2000B
    • 1945-Jan-24

    The diagram is annotated in red and blue ink, indicating first and second position.

    Arnold Beckman invented his first pH meter in 1934 at the request of a chemist from the California citrus industry, who needed an…

    • 1945-Feb-03

    In this letter, J. H. Rushton of the National Defense Research Committee requests an update on the status of F and G model oxygen meter instruments.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology…

    • 1945-Feb-14

    Arnold Beckman informs J. H. Rushton that the Model G oxygen meter is ready for testing, but the Model F is not. An order has been received from the Linde Company, but not fulfilled, and an experimental instrument was…

    • 1945-Feb-16

    This letter regards the use of oxygen meters on submarines and in hospitals, issues of cost and portability, and the Naval Research Laboratory's interest in detecting other gases.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design…

    • 1945

    Dr. Arnold O. Beckman (1900-2004) invented the first commercially successful electric pH meter in 1934 and thus began a long career manufacturing scientific and medical instruments with National Technical Laboratories,…

    • 1945-Nov-12

    Arnold Beckman discusses the status of contract reports, an instrument damaged during shipment, and asks about Spencer Prentiss's post-war plans. He expects to consult with Linus Pauling to decide which instrument to…

    • 1945-Sep-20

    Arnold Beckman notes that he has been busy after the "termination of the war" and discusses bugs in the Model E and complaints about the ruggedness of the oxygen meter.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during…

    • 1945-Sep-05

    Prentiss responds to Kauffman's assessment of the hospital oxygen analyzer, with emphasis upon the question of its ruggedness.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman…

    • 1945-Jul-11

    The letter discusses testing of the Pauling hospital oxygen meter and concerns about its ruggedness--specifically, its ability to survive being dropped onto a stone floor from a height of three feet.

    Developed from a…

    • 1945-Jul-02

    In this letter, Beckman describes the specifications of the aircraft model oxygen meter (the Model L).

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind Beckman Instruments’ oxygen analyzers…

    • 1945-Jul-02

    Arnold Beckman expresses concern that the secrecy of the oxygen meter project could adversely affect sales in the anticipated post-war markets.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology behind…

    • 1945-Apr-07

    The letter sketches the specifications for a partial pressure indicator for use in aircraft, and notes that a prototype has already been constructed. The recipient may be a member of the Navy's Research and Development…

    • 1945-Feb-28

    The letter discusses the various parties interested in testing Pauling oxygen meters and the possibility of meeting in Washington or Philadelphia.

    Developed from a Linus Pauling design during WWII, the technology…

    • 1945-Jan-23

    In this letter, Beckman discusses the testing and production of various models of the Pauling oxygen meter. Model F is discussed in the most detail, but Models P, G, and a damaged aircraft Model L are also mentioned.