Oral history interview with Vincent L. Gregory, Jr.

Oral history interview with Vincent L. Gregory, Jr.

  • 1995-Feb-14

Vincent L. Gregory begins this interview with a description of growing up in a family of nine during the Depression. While deciding between entering the priesthood and a business career, Gregory opted to study economics at Princeton University. He finished a year at Princeton before enlisting in the U.S. Army Air Force at the start of World War II, and served as a fighter pilot in Europe during the war. After the war, Gregory simultaneously gained both a Bachelor's degree at Princeton University and a Master's degree at Harvard University. Then in 1949, he began his career at the Rohm and Haas Company by conducting internal auditing in three plants. After three years, Gregory was transferred to France to start up the first Rohm and Haas plant outside the United States. He then ran Rohm and Haas' agricultural-chemical operations in England before becoming Director of European Operations. Under his leadership, Rohm and Haas-Europe's share of total company profits increased from one to thirty percent, building on postwar conditions and Rohm and Haas' quality products and customer service. Gregory then returned to the United States to head operations in Latin America and the Pacific. In 1970, F. Otto Haas chose Gregory as the first non-family president of Rohm and Haas. Gregory instituted such changes as a ten percent across-the-board downsizing, adding board directors from outside Rohm and Haas, and revamping the company's management system. The oil crisis, along with DuPont Lycra's increasing market share in polyesters, led to Gregory's decision to withdraw Rohm and Haas' stretch fabric, Anim-8, from the market. Gregory then focused the company's product lines on polymers, plastics, and agricultural chemicals. Additionally, he tightened the company's environmental controls when bis-chloromethyl ether was discovered to cause cancer in rats and participated in hearings leading to the passage of the Toxic Substance Control Act [TOSCA]. Gregory's support of R&D led to the development of Vacor, which was later taken off the market, and Blazer. Here, Gregory discusses the CEO's role in supporting R&D, his views on teamwork, and the future of innovation in the chemical industry. He ends the interview by describing his work with the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology [CIIT] and the Center for Cancer Prevention at Harvard University.

Interviewee
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Original file type MP3, PDF
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Extent
  • 54 pages
Language
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Rights In Copyright - Non-Commercial Use Permitted
Rights holder
  • Science History Institute
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  • Courtesy of Science History Institute

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Cite as

Vincent L. Gregory, interviewed by James J. Bohning in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on February 14, 1995. Philadelphia: Science History Institute, n.d. Oral History Transcript 0133. https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/bwo4022.

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Transcript (Published Version)

The published version of the transcript may diverge from the interview audio due to edits to the transcript made by staff of the Center for Oral History, often at the request of the interviewee, during the transcript review process.

Complete Interview Audio File Web-quality download

6 Separate Interview Segments Archival-quality downloads